Video of the Day: River Whyless – “Born In The Right Country”

This one is a thinker guys. Did you already watch it? Go watch it again, I’ll wait. This is one of my favorite pieces of art I’ve seen in a long time. There’s a ton to unpack here, and I’m going to try, but first let me tell you why I connect with this song so intensely. There are two primary reasons.

  1. I grew up in the South. Like the real South. Let’s call it a state Trump won with 54%. The South isn’t inherently racist, but it’s hard not to grow up around some racist attitudes, even from people who I consider good people. For example, my parents would claim not to be racist, but I remember some stern warnings to my sister about a black kid named Jovan that was coming around. I don’t think my parents are bad people, and they are not KKK level racist, but I’m using them as an example to explain that even my educated parents, who are charitable and kind, are racist. The last frame of this video that scrolls “wolves don’t exist” after we’ve watched an entire video of a black kid being led around by a wolf is exactly how baffled I’ve felt for most of my life, watching good natured people, stay willfully ignorant to the prejudices they hold, and the damage that does.
  2. I don’t live in the South anymore, but that doesn’t solve the racism problem the way you might idealize when you’re growing up in a small town dreaming of moving to a liberal utopia. I teach at a private school in the suburbs of Rhode Island where an administrator was removed last year for getting caught using a few racial slurs. I have students sitting behind desks every day who swear Colin Kaepernick is un-American, and Michael Brown deserved to be shot for being a “thug.” I don’t necessarily think these are bad people, mostly because I’ve made it my goal in life to talk through ignorance with people, and if I believe people can’t learn and change, I think I’d become quite depressed. The thing that I most associate with both of these experiences, my past, and my present, is that most of these people just have no idea the amount of privilege they are carrying. It seems somehow offensive to their character to suggest that they are not “self-made” or that someone has it harder than them. Mostly I think this is because we all have our struggles, and it makes us feel bad that we aren’t billionaires either, so how dare people say they have it harder than us? On the other hand, to admit some people are living with a level of prejudice and difference that you can’t fully comprehend somehow seems like a weak thing for these people to admit.

Alright, enough about me. Let’s talk about the video. We can immediately get the sense where it’s going when we read the title, “Born in the Right Country”. The title itself evokes a lot of the immigration struggles we have going on right now, where a person or family is attempting to find a better life in America, despite the risks involved, and is being treated inhuman because of it. But in the video, we see a slightly different angle. We follow the story of a young black male going to high school, with a wolf around his wrist. We also see that his mother, and a girl wearing a hijab also have their own wolves, while the white kids do not. This seems to suggest that even though presumably these characters didn’t immigrate here, they were still born in the “wrong” country. Not in a literal sense, but in the sense that the rules operate differently for them because of generations of social prejudice and oppression. The video shows this clearly with the white father looking disapprovingly at the potential of his daughter being in an interracial relationship, and also with the boy being stopped on the way home by the police, when he was just minding his own business. It obviously clinches up your stomach when you see those blue lights because of the countless ways that’s gone badly over the past several years (Micheal Brown, Trayvon Martin, Oscar Grant, etc. etc.).

When we explore the lyrics, we see them dripping with sarcasm from the perspective of Trump, or his followers, or anyone who feels like they are superior purely because they were born white and/or affluent.

“I’ll tell you baby, a secret Manufactured truth is easy to sell When you own the factory And you own the hearts of the clientele But can you really blame me? Built on a system where some must fail So that you can break through If you’ve got the right skin Or you’re born in the right country”

The perspective shifts after this point to directly talk to these people and attempt to wake them out of their ignorance:

“Don’t you know you’re lucky kid You were raised on the right side of town Born rich, now you’re yelling “I’ve seen the inside and you’re out” But can I truly blame you? We’re built on the dreams we feed to the poor So that you can break through If you’ve got the right name Or you’ve got the right god Or you’re born in the right country”

But unfortunately, the system is set up this way. There are people profiting from the lower and middle class fighting amongst themselves. Instead of placing the blame at the top, we are continually told to look at our neighbor with different skin, heritage, religion, and blame them for any short comings or failures. It’s classic scapegoating, and this current regime is not the first to use it. My only hope is that more and more people can try to see through it for what it really is; and the best way to do that is through people using their artistic talents, like River Whyless to try to break through to people in a language they can understand.

-Caleb

We’ve added this to our July TOTD playlist. Check it out here.

We just released a new podcast episode, on the theme of Addiction. You can check that out along with all the others, right here. 

 

Video of the Day: Samantha Clemons “Burn”

With powerful vocals and unapologetic lyrics, Samantha Clemons’ song, “Burn,” is a song that’s made for anyone who has been oppressed and made to feel like that oppression is okay. She punches home the idea that when there is oppression in any form, there’s no reason for the oppressed to have to ‘walk a mile in the other’s shoes’ when the opposition’s goal is to keep you underfoot. The song is applicable on so many levels in our country right now: politically, racially, across genders, and really on an almost infinite number of other levels.

When did you go change the rules?
When did you come to be so cruel?
I may be a bit naive
But how can our dreams
All of our freedom
Mean nothing to you?

Yeah, I just crossed the line
No need for compromise
Yeah, mine fit me just fine
No need to walk
in your shoes

SAMANTHA CLEMONS PROMO 1.jpg

Where there is oppression, there is an oppressor, and Samantha has obviously had enough. She goes on to sing about how she’s going to stand her ground, and if she continues to be put down, she will take more drastic measures by burning it all down. Now, if you know me, I’m not a big advocate for violence, but I definitely think there’s a time and place for more than words. This song seems to be in the same camp as me. Stand firmly and stand boldly, but if there’s still no change, proceed to the next logical step. The progression is important.

As a straight white male with a nuclear family, I haven’t faced any kind of real oppression, so anything I say is completely from an outsiders standpoint. I can sympathize, but can’t fully empathize. I will say this though; we are at a point in this country where even if you can’t empathize, morality should dictate that if you do nothing, you are enabling the oppression. Even if you don’t fully understand, you still have to stand up.

Video of the Day: Kate Boothman – “I Am An Animal”

Let’s talk about songs that sound like certain seasons. I know it’s currently summer, but this song feels like fall to me. I can feel leaves crunching under my feet when I hear it. I can smell earth as I walk down a changing trail when I hear it. I really like how this video also captures some of that aesthetic, along with the shifting overlays that keep you disoriented and unsure.

About Kate Boothman

“Kate has gained a reputation as a solo performer, playing repeatedly as the invited opener for established songwriting talents like Blue Rodeo, Wilco, Joe Pernice (The Pernice Brothers), Hope Sandoval (Mazzy Star), and Kathleen Edwards . After taking 3 years to settle back into the Northumberland Hills from where she came, Kate emerges with the rock and roll venture – I Am An Animal.”

Want to hear more? We’ve added this song to our July TOTD playlist on Spotify. Check that out here.

 

Video of the Day – Rathbone “Ain’t Somebody Here”

Easily the winner for the most unique music video we’ve had on the blog yet, Rathbone’s “Ain’t Somebody Here” is avant garde funk; it’s experimental fun, but firmly rooted in funk with a strong bass line and the instrumentation used throughout. It’s not often that I can picture a song in both a Fast and Furious movie and a sophisticated art heist film. Make your own judgements on the video, but one thing is certain; Rathbone isn’t afraid to go outside of the lines, and we absolutely love the direction he’s taking his art.

Also, keep up with our new Spotify playlist to make sure you catch all of our July artists.

And checkout our podcast here.

Video of the Day: Dave Paulson “Don’t Let It Get You Down” – Sandusky, Ohio

What? Was I not going to share a video that uses snippets of Tommy Boy? It turns out the whole album, Sandusky, Ohio is based around Tommy Boy. No, seriously. And it’s very good. When pressed on it, Dave says: “It is a sincere and earnest album, not a joke in the slightest.” And really, at it’s core, there is a lot of emotional depth to Tommy Boy. Yes, it’s a silly movie, but at it’s core it’s an exploration of relationships, fathers and sons, transfers of power, and a lot of other more serious themes that when looked at through a certain lens can become a lot more powerful than first glance.

This particular track is described as: “Tommy and Richard hit the road to try to sell enough brake pads to save the company, and have to stay optimistic through numerous rejections” And each track has a brief synopsis on Dave’s website: sanduskyoh.co 

This is a trend I’d love to see get started. Taking projects that on the surface don’t seem like a serious exploration, and then just making amazing art with it anyway.

-Caleb

 

 

Video of the Day: Djo Life – “The Cactus Song”

 

Described briefly as “A musical rarity about the forbidden love between man and cactus,” Djo Life has our vote for best Cactus love song of the year. The video has a unique, draw as you go sort of style to it, with, you guessed it, tons of pictures of cactuses, cacti? Of course, as you might expect, love between a man and a cactus has it’s complications, including pricks of the hand, that result in blood spilling down into the pot the cactus is housed in.

Bio: About Djo Life

“Djo Life is a one piece band based in the sun drenched environs of Tucson, AZ. Originally hailing from NYC, Djo practiced his song craft in various bands of no great acclaim both in NY and later in Boston’s Hot Wire Zeppo and the very defunct The 520s.  Upon arriving in Tucson to attend graduate school, he continued to pen his unique pop songs(instead of studying) just for personal enjoyment.

Djo treats each song as a singular entity and tries to infuse each song with as many catchy hooks and phrases as possible. “Each song is a lyrical poem with the music as a means to augment the composition into something altogether precious and singular”.   Ultimately, his love of New Wave and Classic Rock seeps into each track as if by osmosis.

Much of 2018 will be spent in the studio working on new material released one song after another. New releases can be found at djolife.com”

 

I know the next time I’m looking for love stories between a man and an desert plant, I’ll be visiting djolife.com for sure.

-Caleb

I don’t know if you know this, but we released a podcast episode yesterday. You can find that here.

Video of the Day: Mahalia “I Wish I Missed My Ex”

Let’s end this Monday right. This track is so smooth, and also expresses a really unconventional sentiment: “damn, I wish I missed my ex”. I really appreciate the idea of regretting how much you don’t care about your ex’s pain. This is nicely exemplified in the video by running the whole video backwards, which signifies a look backwards of some sort. It definitely sucks to be on the wrong side of a break up where you are the groveling fool who hasn’t gotten over things, but it also sucks to see someone you care about and spent time with, groveling at your feet. Maybe it doesn’t suck as bad, but it’s still not an enviable position. You are simultaneously trying to be empathetic and losing your patience.

Press release: “The first time I heard IWIMME, I knew the track needed a big idea. I’ve always loved Spike Jonze’s video for “Drop” by the Pharcyde and decided to pay homage by creating a backwards music video with a contemporary spin. I hired a linguist from UCLA to teach Mahalia the song backwards which she surprisingly learned in a day. The DP, Dustin Lane, and I have always wanted to make something in our neighborhood, Highland Park. We chose family owned locations and hired a few extras while scouting the neighborhood. Mahalia’s reversed performance oozes spontaneity and confidence. I can’t thank her enough for joining us on the journey, and signing on to recreate this insane concept.”

That’s really crazy that she literally learned the song backwards for the video, I assume they just had her going forward with everything else going backwards in the editing bay.

-Caleb