Mid Day Music Blast: Elliot Taylor “Different Somehow”

In the middle of a US tour with The Pierce Brothers, this UK singer-songwriter is turning heads with his raspy vocals and authentic lyrics. The thing that turned my head though was when Elliot told us that this song was recorded in a single take with just one microphone. If you have any experience recording anything at all really, you know how elusive the “one take” is. Elliot absolutely nails it with this track.

Elliot weaves a tale of a relationship, or honestly, maybe not even a relationship, but a tale of two passing ships. They know that their time could be limited together, so the song embraces the idea that we should live in the moment and take advantage of our opportunities. It goes into the idea that even throughout different parts of their time together, there are very distinct points where life was different for them both; from the butterfly stages, all the way to the breakup at the end. I just finished a semi-relevant episode of Black Mirror last night, so that could be my mind forcing a connection. In the episode, most people have this chip in their head that records their whole life. Long story short, and without ruining any plot points, the protagonist of the story rewinds to see various points of his relationship with his wife, good and bad. This song is like that episode. It’s snippets of their life together, and each one is very clearly a separate stage in how they felt about each other.

Elliot Taylor is a raw and talented storyteller with the perfect blend of soul and control. His debut EP, Live from Hell’s Kitchen, released four days ago, and I am absolutely hooked. If the above song didn’t immediately get Elliot added to your Spotify playlists, check out the music video below.

Also, if you want to listen to all of the bands we have featured for the month of June, head over to our Spotify playlist to check that out.

Video of the Day: PreCog “Compete”

PreCog, the dark-electronic band based out of Nashville, has come in swinging haymakers with this video, both literally and figuratively. PreCog tells the story of what it costs to be right, and how the price you pay typically isn’t worth what you gain.

Bret Pemelton, the video’s director and the guitarist of the band, says, “I went with a literal take on the song’s title.  I liked the idea of this mystical female person arriving out of nowhere and manipulates the, seemingly disconnected, young couple to resort to their primal instincts. The final scene shows the couple, in a defeated posture, approaching and mounting an Olympic type podium, both at equal heights at opposite sides. The torch bearing mystical woman rises as the victor.  Like two warring factions, countries and ideologies that seek to decimate the other, there’s never really any winners. Justice raises her torch to illuminate this ugly truth.”

I think that the truth of the song also carries over into our personal lives. The battle to be right with friends and family sometimes leads to irreparable damage, and nothing to show for it. There are definitely things that we need to stand our ground on, but how many times do arguments end with both parties forgetting what the fight started about in the first place?

“Be wrong today. At the very least, don’t shove your ‘right’ in someone else’s face.” – Mystical Female probably

TOTD: Jesse Daniel “Gracie Henrietta”

 

It’s Friday night! Are you guys partying? The second you hit a lull and need a pick me up, throw this song on the house playlist to part like it’s 1955 (but now you have MDMA and Tinder). I really can’t get enough of this song. Whoever is playing the piano is absolutely ripping!

 

“Jesse Daniel’s self-titled debut album sounds both fresh and familiar from beginning to end. Pairing classic country styling with honest and compelling lyrics, Jesse’s album plays like an old favorite with a twist that is both edgy and uniquely his own.”

– Zach Taylor, Raised Rowdy

I really couldn’t agree more with this quote from Jesse’s website. When I read a bit about Jesse on his website, it seems that he has a deeply American story to tell, full of broken families, picking yourself up by the bootstraps, homesteading, heart break, and so much more. If you are tired of pop-country that you hear on the radio, but want some intellectual twang in your life, you can’t go wrong with Jesse Daniel.

 

-Caleb

 

TOTD: Fort Hill “Marks”

Not only is this the happy drop day of a new song, it’s the first song from Ethan Heyenga operating under the name, Fort Hill. What a way to debut!

The only thing more haunting than the piano is Ethan’s falsetto. There is a disjointed brass and synth track that is a very dangerous attempt, but Ethan nails it flawlessly. Somehow disjointed horns brought the whole song together, especially going into the buildup at around the 3 minute mark.

This is a truly remarkable debut track, and we here at B-Side Guys can’t wait to work with Ethan again for any new releases he brings out. Now press play, and get ready to go on a trip.

Morning Commute Double Feature: Jim Audet

Get ready for a music filled day from B-Side Guys! New music Friday means tons and tons of new music just for you guys!

“Mojave Rain” is about the procrastination of the government to do anything about mass shootings, and how it becomes too late for those who are unfortunate enough to be involved in these events.

“Sex & Money” is track 1 off “The Lookout EP” set to release June 1st on Spotify. “The Lookout EP” is an “off the wall” concept record dealing with a spectrum of socio-political problems, mainly issues surrounding our culture’s obsession with sex, money, and violence in the media.

 

Alright. Now that you’ve listened to both, let’s explore them:

 

“Mojave Rain

First of all, how great is this guy’s voice? I told him he sounds like a slightly higher pitched Jim Morrison, especially on the “Sex and Money” track. The song itself is very topical, unfortunately it’s topical about every two weeks or so, because it’s about mass shootings and the governmental response to them.

The song starts with really strong, jarring lyrics:

“They no need no control
Gonna bet a dime, little Suzie, gonna bet your soul”

Referring to the seeming willingness for our government to sacrifice children for a quick buck, or more specifically the willingness of those who lobby the government to do so. Obviously gun control is a hot button layered issue, but I think it’s art’s job to help us think about these things that effect us, and the song really makes it clear what’s at stake in this debate.

“Good God, it’s too late,
Got caught up in a downpour, in the Mojave Rain

Say son, did you make the grade?
Save a brother down with a barricade, when there was rain in the Mojave?
Was it oh, so D.F.A, with a window wide on 32? ”

 

I love the dissonance between making the grade and saving someone. These two things shouldn’t be happening side by side, and you could argue if they are happening side by side, the learning environment is going to be effected. My biggest question in the song is why the title and repetition of Mojave rain? I know the Mojave is a desert, so it doesn’t get much rain. In fact it is the driest desert in all of North America. Maybe he’s using that as a metaphor for how unlikely it is to see any change on this issue soon? What do you guys think?

 

 

“Sex and Money”

I’m not going to talk about this one too at length because (hint hint) you’re going to be seeing this one again on the podcast. But like I mentioned before, how much does this song sound like a modernized The Doors song? I also love the throwback visuals of the video. There is a lot to explore here regarding our societies relationship to sex, money, and violence, and we will be following up that discussion on our podcast in the coming weeks, so stay tuned for that. In the meantime, check out all of Jim Audet’s new EP right here, and support this dude so we can see what else he comes up with.

 

-Caleb