Video of the Day: Samantha Clemons “Burn”

With powerful vocals and unapologetic lyrics, Samantha Clemons’ song, “Burn,” is a song that’s made for anyone who has been oppressed and made to feel like that oppression is okay. She punches home the idea that when there is oppression in any form, there’s no reason for the oppressed to have to ‘walk a mile in the other’s shoes’ when the opposition’s goal is to keep you underfoot. The song is applicable on so many levels in our country right now: politically, racially, across genders, and really on an almost infinite number of other levels.

When did you go change the rules?
When did you come to be so cruel?
I may be a bit naive
But how can our dreams
All of our freedom
Mean nothing to you?

Yeah, I just crossed the line
No need for compromise
Yeah, mine fit me just fine
No need to walk
in your shoes

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Where there is oppression, there is an oppressor, and Samantha has obviously had enough. She goes on to sing about how she’s going to stand her ground, and if she continues to be put down, she will take more drastic measures by burning it all down. Now, if you know me, I’m not a big advocate for violence, but I definitely think there’s a time and place for more than words. This song seems to be in the same camp as me. Stand firmly and stand boldly, but if there’s still no change, proceed to the next logical step. The progression is important.

As a straight white male with a nuclear family, I haven’t faced any kind of real oppression, so anything I say is completely from an outsiders standpoint. I can sympathize, but can’t fully empathize. I will say this though; we are at a point in this country where even if you can’t empathize, morality should dictate that if you do nothing, you are enabling the oppression. Even if you don’t fully understand, you still have to stand up.

Video of the Day: Kate Boothman – “I Am An Animal”

Let’s talk about songs that sound like certain seasons. I know it’s currently summer, but this song feels like fall to me. I can feel leaves crunching under my feet when I hear it. I can smell earth as I walk down a changing trail when I hear it. I really like how this video also captures some of that aesthetic, along with the shifting overlays that keep you disoriented and unsure.

About Kate Boothman

“Kate has gained a reputation as a solo performer, playing repeatedly as the invited opener for established songwriting talents like Blue Rodeo, Wilco, Joe Pernice (The Pernice Brothers), Hope Sandoval (Mazzy Star), and Kathleen Edwards . After taking 3 years to settle back into the Northumberland Hills from where she came, Kate emerges with the rock and roll venture – I Am An Animal.”

Want to hear more? We’ve added this song to our July TOTD playlist on Spotify. Check that out here.

 

Video of the Day – Rathbone “Ain’t Somebody Here”

Easily the winner for the most unique music video we’ve had on the blog yet, Rathbone’s “Ain’t Somebody Here” is avant garde funk; it’s experimental fun, but firmly rooted in funk with a strong bass line and the instrumentation used throughout. It’s not often that I can picture a song in both a Fast and Furious movie and a sophisticated art heist film. Make your own judgements on the video, but one thing is certain; Rathbone isn’t afraid to go outside of the lines, and we absolutely love the direction he’s taking his art.

Also, keep up with our new Spotify playlist to make sure you catch all of our July artists.

And checkout our podcast here.

Video of the Day: Dave Paulson “Don’t Let It Get You Down” – Sandusky, Ohio

What? Was I not going to share a video that uses snippets of Tommy Boy? It turns out the whole album, Sandusky, Ohio is based around Tommy Boy. No, seriously. And it’s very good. When pressed on it, Dave says: “It is a sincere and earnest album, not a joke in the slightest.” And really, at it’s core, there is a lot of emotional depth to Tommy Boy. Yes, it’s a silly movie, but at it’s core it’s an exploration of relationships, fathers and sons, transfers of power, and a lot of other more serious themes that when looked at through a certain lens can become a lot more powerful than first glance.

This particular track is described as: “Tommy and Richard hit the road to try to sell enough brake pads to save the company, and have to stay optimistic through numerous rejections” And each track has a brief synopsis on Dave’s website: sanduskyoh.co 

This is a trend I’d love to see get started. Taking projects that on the surface don’t seem like a serious exploration, and then just making amazing art with it anyway.

-Caleb

 

 

Video of the Day: Djo Life – “The Cactus Song”

 

Described briefly as “A musical rarity about the forbidden love between man and cactus,” Djo Life has our vote for best Cactus love song of the year. The video has a unique, draw as you go sort of style to it, with, you guessed it, tons of pictures of cactuses, cacti? Of course, as you might expect, love between a man and a cactus has it’s complications, including pricks of the hand, that result in blood spilling down into the pot the cactus is housed in.

Bio: About Djo Life

“Djo Life is a one piece band based in the sun drenched environs of Tucson, AZ. Originally hailing from NYC, Djo practiced his song craft in various bands of no great acclaim both in NY and later in Boston’s Hot Wire Zeppo and the very defunct The 520s.  Upon arriving in Tucson to attend graduate school, he continued to pen his unique pop songs(instead of studying) just for personal enjoyment.

Djo treats each song as a singular entity and tries to infuse each song with as many catchy hooks and phrases as possible. “Each song is a lyrical poem with the music as a means to augment the composition into something altogether precious and singular”.   Ultimately, his love of New Wave and Classic Rock seeps into each track as if by osmosis.

Much of 2018 will be spent in the studio working on new material released one song after another. New releases can be found at djolife.com”

 

I know the next time I’m looking for love stories between a man and an desert plant, I’ll be visiting djolife.com for sure.

-Caleb

I don’t know if you know this, but we released a podcast episode yesterday. You can find that here.

Video of the Day: Mahalia “I Wish I Missed My Ex”

Let’s end this Monday right. This track is so smooth, and also expresses a really unconventional sentiment: “damn, I wish I missed my ex”. I really appreciate the idea of regretting how much you don’t care about your ex’s pain. This is nicely exemplified in the video by running the whole video backwards, which signifies a look backwards of some sort. It definitely sucks to be on the wrong side of a break up where you are the groveling fool who hasn’t gotten over things, but it also sucks to see someone you care about and spent time with, groveling at your feet. Maybe it doesn’t suck as bad, but it’s still not an enviable position. You are simultaneously trying to be empathetic and losing your patience.

Press release: “The first time I heard IWIMME, I knew the track needed a big idea. I’ve always loved Spike Jonze’s video for “Drop” by the Pharcyde and decided to pay homage by creating a backwards music video with a contemporary spin. I hired a linguist from UCLA to teach Mahalia the song backwards which she surprisingly learned in a day. The DP, Dustin Lane, and I have always wanted to make something in our neighborhood, Highland Park. We chose family owned locations and hired a few extras while scouting the neighborhood. Mahalia’s reversed performance oozes spontaneity and confidence. I can’t thank her enough for joining us on the journey, and signing on to recreate this insane concept.”

That’s really crazy that she literally learned the song backwards for the video, I assume they just had her going forward with everything else going backwards in the editing bay.

-Caleb

 

 

Video of the Day: Jules Rendell ft. Goz-i-am – “The Return”

It really doesn’t get much more gorgeous than this. The music is soothing and beautifully sung. The cinematography knows how to be subtle with it’s shots of the gorgeous piano. On their press package they explained a bit about why they chose to do such a stripped down version of this track:

“There was something about the third single from my album IMAGINE, The Return, that called out for a more raw, emotional offering… maybe it’s because we all worry too much and deep down we want to be free of it. We stripped out the electronic aspects of the song and took it back to basics with just a grand piano and vocal, reminiscent of an Emeli Sandé reworking or an intimate Jessie Ware vocal.

We spend our lives worrying about things that don’t really matter. We chase after success, value achievement and stature, but it’s a trap that can tie us up. I think love is what can free us from all that stuff, a place of acceptance. That’s what the song is about.”

That’s what I love most about this song too. It almost sounds like a gospel song in structure, though she nicely mentions the “chains of religion” in the song. But what I mean is it’s one of those songs that makes you tear up and you don’t really know why. It warns us of worrying our lives away, while also seeming to swell to a sea of positivity and hope that touches something deeply human inside us. If it doesn’t, poke yourself with a stick or something.

-Caleb

Want to hear the original album version of “The Return”? We did too, so we added it to our June TOTD Spotify playlist. Check that out here.