Video of the Day: Househats – “I’ve Been Broken”

I really can’t get enough of a solid rock riff. This band has an excellent style that reminds me a bit of early Weezer, with some upbeat riffs, and smooth vocals, both of which somewhat belie the deeper message in the lyrics. Also, this video is just really fun and interesting. I really enjoy watching the singer seemingly singing to a lamp, and the instruments blowing shit up. And then we see the “I’ve been broken” start to apply to not only the objects, but the clothes and bodies of the band members themselves. Overall, it’s a really fun group with a lot of potential. I could see them being on an alt. rock station near you very soon, if they aren’t already.

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Bio: Following on from releasing their critically praised new single ‘I’ve Been Broken’, Melbourne-based trio Househats have just revealed the accompanying music video – directed by Jack Rintoul (Wendyhouse).

Shot in a studio in Melbourne, ‘I’ve Been Broken’ sees both Househats and director Rintoul on their music video debut. Keeping within the theme of the song, the clip features inanimate objects being broken down and destroyed, and warped beyond reality.

-Caleb

Want to hear more? We’ve added this track and more to our August Spotify TOTD Playlist.

 

 

Video of the Day: Jane in Space – “Breaking Glass”

 

There is so much to like here. The video itself is awesome regardless of the music, but I do have to emphasize how much I love the music. The vocals and build up on the percussion in particular really strike me as exceptional. Once you get into the meat of the video, I love the simple design that really makes you ponder a lot about the purpose of it all. Obviously the ability to move around the glass with his mind has some sort of connection to the title “Breaking Glass.” For me, the whole time I was waiting on a violent eruption where the glass shatters everywhere; it created a sense of anxiety through the whole video for me. What we got instead was an apathetic sort of falling motion while the protagonist solemnly puts his head on the table. And ultimately I guess the reveal is that he’s not moving the glass, some sort of earthquake or external force is? I love how symbolic the whole thing is, and it allows the viewer to make a lot of their own meaning.

“But if you free your desires then we’ll free our devotion to you
Always inclined to be on top, to reach the top
Until you’re out of time
Empty words, brittle heart
We still raise this world on breaking glass

We left her out in the rain to bleed again”

I think some of the meaning is illuminated in the lyrics, which seem to suggest that our society, which is constantly aimed at achievement and the almighty dollar. could be the source of a lot of our problems. That really the only way to keep this sort of society going, is by having people left out of it. The constant haves and have nots equation. It’s more than that, because that assumes that everyone even wants to be a part of it in the first place, which of course, if a lot of us had our druthers, we probably would focus more on our passions than on our money. It’s really a beautiful constructed song and video with a lot of questions still left to answer. What are you guys’ thoughts? Comment below or message me on Facebook.

-Caleb

We added this song and more to our Spotify August TOTD Playlist. Check that out here.

Video of the Day: Sea High – “Luv.”

I love the visual style of this video. Parts of it remind me of those old flash videos on NewGrounds.com and part of it is a genius multimedia project that combines pictures, live drawn art, and movement. It’s really beautiful. The other really essential element to this song is the lyrics. Let’s dive into what makes them so effective:

“And I’m ever grown in a wood of gold
And I can’t be told when to call or fold
And I’m always talking and I can’t shut up
And I’m awful flawed but I’ve mastered stuff
And I think you’re cool.. you’re.. you’re.. you’re really nice like”

The whole song mixes a sense of poetry (as you can see in the repetition and anaphora) and conversational tone ( as you can see with the seeming stutter). This gives the song an understandable but simultaneously complex and abstract vibe. The whole first half of the song seems to be a listing off of shortcomings or anxieties, while the last half is a thank you letter:

“And it’s you that was constant you killed my concerns
It was you that was constant you killed my concerns
You should know you resurrected my trust
It was you that was constant this love is a must
(Spoken)
And if you were my only fan I’d never stop making music,
And you’re the only one pulling me through this
And I really should be saying this out loud but I can’t and
For now I’m just a ghost I’m just a phantom … ”

This whole section seems like it’s leading into a love note, but then we get the subversion of that at the end, and we see that he hasn’t said this to this person at all. He’s just a “ghost” or a “phantom”. I also really like that we get that classic movie moment in the video, when it ends with a girl picking up the phone trying to connect, but he’s already gone. It’s a very relatable theme of Unrequited Love (which we did a podcast episode on).

 

Bio: Sea High is a multi instrumentalist rapper and singer-songwriter from Ireland, using homegrown beats made by himself and O’B1 from Off Key Collective, a grassroots label that they co-founded

Sea High takes hip hop and uses it to convey abstract, conceptual themes of love, hate and everything inbetween.

LUV. Is an unsent message to a special someone that takes your breath, words and worries away.

 

-Caleb

Want to hear more music? We’ve added this song and more to our August TOTD Spotify Playlist. 

Video of the Day: River Whyless – “Born In The Right Country”

This one is a thinker guys. Did you already watch it? Go watch it again, I’ll wait. This is one of my favorite pieces of art I’ve seen in a long time. There’s a ton to unpack here, and I’m going to try, but first let me tell you why I connect with this song so intensely. There are two primary reasons.

  1. I grew up in the South. Like the real South. Let’s call it a state Trump won with 54%. The South isn’t inherently racist, but it’s hard not to grow up around some racist attitudes, even from people who I consider good people. For example, my parents would claim not to be racist, but I remember some stern warnings to my sister about a black kid named Jovan that was coming around. I don’t think my parents are bad people, and they are not KKK level racist, but I’m using them as an example to explain that even my educated parents, who are charitable and kind, are racist. The last frame of this video that scrolls “wolves don’t exist” after we’ve watched an entire video of a black kid being led around by a wolf is exactly how baffled I’ve felt for most of my life, watching good natured people, stay willfully ignorant to the prejudices they hold, and the damage that does.
  2. I don’t live in the South anymore, but that doesn’t solve the racism problem the way you might idealize when you’re growing up in a small town dreaming of moving to a liberal utopia. I teach at a private school in the suburbs of Rhode Island where an administrator was removed last year for getting caught using a few racial slurs. I have students sitting behind desks every day who swear Colin Kaepernick is un-American, and Michael Brown deserved to be shot for being a “thug.” I don’t necessarily think these are bad people, mostly because I’ve made it my goal in life to talk through ignorance with people, and if I believe people can’t learn and change, I think I’d become quite depressed. The thing that I most associate with both of these experiences, my past, and my present, is that most of these people just have no idea the amount of privilege they are carrying. It seems somehow offensive to their character to suggest that they are not “self-made” or that someone has it harder than them. Mostly I think this is because we all have our struggles, and it makes us feel bad that we aren’t billionaires either, so how dare people say they have it harder than us? On the other hand, to admit some people are living with a level of prejudice and difference that you can’t fully comprehend somehow seems like a weak thing for these people to admit.

Alright, enough about me. Let’s talk about the video. We can immediately get the sense where it’s going when we read the title, “Born in the Right Country”. The title itself evokes a lot of the immigration struggles we have going on right now, where a person or family is attempting to find a better life in America, despite the risks involved, and is being treated inhuman because of it. But in the video, we see a slightly different angle. We follow the story of a young black male going to high school, with a wolf around his wrist. We also see that his mother, and a girl wearing a hijab also have their own wolves, while the white kids do not. This seems to suggest that even though presumably these characters didn’t immigrate here, they were still born in the “wrong” country. Not in a literal sense, but in the sense that the rules operate differently for them because of generations of social prejudice and oppression. The video shows this clearly with the white father looking disapprovingly at the potential of his daughter being in an interracial relationship, and also with the boy being stopped on the way home by the police, when he was just minding his own business. It obviously clinches up your stomach when you see those blue lights because of the countless ways that’s gone badly over the past several years (Micheal Brown, Trayvon Martin, Oscar Grant, etc. etc.).

When we explore the lyrics, we see them dripping with sarcasm from the perspective of Trump, or his followers, or anyone who feels like they are superior purely because they were born white and/or affluent.

“I’ll tell you baby, a secret Manufactured truth is easy to sell When you own the factory And you own the hearts of the clientele But can you really blame me? Built on a system where some must fail So that you can break through If you’ve got the right skin Or you’re born in the right country”

The perspective shifts after this point to directly talk to these people and attempt to wake them out of their ignorance:

“Don’t you know you’re lucky kid You were raised on the right side of town Born rich, now you’re yelling “I’ve seen the inside and you’re out” But can I truly blame you? We’re built on the dreams we feed to the poor So that you can break through If you’ve got the right name Or you’ve got the right god Or you’re born in the right country”

But unfortunately, the system is set up this way. There are people profiting from the lower and middle class fighting amongst themselves. Instead of placing the blame at the top, we are continually told to look at our neighbor with different skin, heritage, religion, and blame them for any short comings or failures. It’s classic scapegoating, and this current regime is not the first to use it. My only hope is that more and more people can try to see through it for what it really is; and the best way to do that is through people using their artistic talents, like River Whyless to try to break through to people in a language they can understand.

-Caleb

We’ve added this to our July TOTD playlist. Check it out here.

We just released a new podcast episode, on the theme of Addiction. You can check that out along with all the others, right here.